Gay Activists Need to Read this Book

One of the biggest lies spread throughout our popular culture by gay activists and their willing enablers in the media is that homosexual orientation is biologically fixed. So a person is born with their sexual orientation to the same-sex and there is nothing he or she  can do, or should do, to change that.  It is a basic part of who the person is, like dark skin is for the Aborigine.  Anyone, say for instance evangelical Christians, who believes a person’s sexual orientation and same-sex attraction can be “changed” is stupid and essentially uneducated.

This lie has taken such deep root in our society that anyone who even makes an effort with helping a person change his or her sexual orientation is deemed abusive. Counseling therapy that seeks to help “re-orient” a person’s homosexual tendencies to healthy, opposite sex attraction is viewed on the same level as practicing lobotomy and shock therapy. The state of California even recently passed legislation prohibiting professional counselors from offering any therapy for homosexual orientation to anyone under the age of 18.

Gay activists go so far as to deny there is any thing called an ex-gay or former homosexual, because none could possibly exist in their worldview. The crippling problem with their anti-ex-gay narrative, however, is the existence of ex-gays who are now married in healthy husband and wife relationships who renounce their former gay lifestyle.

One such individual has recently published her testimony about coming out of the gay lifestyle and embracing Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.  Rosaria Champagne Butterfield was not only a lesbian activist, she was also a tenured associate professor at Syracuse University in the English Department with teaching responsibilities in the Center for Women’s Studies. She was on the cutting edge of gay activism, particularly feminist gay activism.

Then God got a hold of her life. Through the ministry of a Reformed Presbyterian minister and his wife, the two challenged Rosaria and God used their simple evangelism to save and redeem her. Her conversion, she remarks, was like an “alien abduction” which is an apt illustration seeing how it is God alone who totally transforms a person.

Rosaria is now married to a pastor with a family of her own. She tells her testimony in a book entitled, Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert, a book I first heard about through a book review by Carl Trueman. He and his podcast co-host did a 30 minute program discussing the book which I would recommend downloading and giving a listen.

Rosaria also has a website where other interviews, both audio and video, can be downloaded or watched.

She stands as a trophy of God’s redeeming grace. An living monument of how God not only saves a person, but also supernaturally transforms an individual from a radical lifestyle in rebellion against Him to a radical lifestyle submitted to Him.  For only God can take a homosexual atheist feminist university professor and make her a God fearing, Proverbs 31 woman who is a stay at home wife and mother who homeschools her children. That is amazing grace indeed!

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “Gay Activists Need to Read this Book

  1. Thanks, Fred. Couple thoughts if I may contribute:
    – This issue has never been explored adequately. The MSM refuse to entertain thoughts that homosexuality is not biological and therefore, the populace believe it is so.
    – The most current “coming out” was an NBA player (can’t remember name). But his twin brother is not gay. If biological, how is that possible?
    – There are males with extra ‘x’ chromosomes. They are susceptible to anger management/violence issues as a result of this. Yet, as a society, we do not accept anger/violent choices regardless of their genetic predisposition. Why do we make an exception for homosexuality?
    – There is more reliable evidence for a genetic predisposition for alcoholism than homosexuality. Yet it is frowned up to drink & drive, be drunk in public, etc… Why then is homosexuality given a pass?

    Keep up the good work.

  2. Thanks Fred, I always appreciate your articles. And very good points Mark.

  3. …She stands as a trophy of God’s redeeming grace. …

    A hearty Amen to that! I haven’t read her book yet, but after hearing the Spin episode I watched all of the videos she was in and I was blown away, once again, by God’ grace in the lives of His children. Another particularly striking “story” in all of this was the way Pastor Ken Smith, his wife, and their whole church ministered to and finally discipled this woman. What a beautiful and much needed testimony to “how now shall we live?” !

    Incidentally, we have grown twin boys, one is gay and the other a true believer–even before his own parents were! .. a whole nuther story :)

    Thanks for the article and links, Fred, I also really appreciate this blog!

  4. Ah yes. the ole ‘bisexual’ argument. Of course, no such category truly exists. It is one of those make-believe people so gay activists can have their cake and eat it too.

  5. “Bisexual” isn’t a made-up category. It simply means a person who is attracted to both genders. Most ex-gays will admit to lingering same-sex temptations, even if they currently have fulfilling sexual relationships with their husbands/wives. To the liberal side, that’s textbook bisexuality, just with the sexual behavior limited to the heterosexual side. To our side, we’d refer to that as heterosexuality marred by sinful temptations. A lot of poor communication happens between Christians and non-Christians about this issue because we use different terms — or, worse, often use the same terms in different ways.

    Let’s not pretend that those who have struggled against same-sex attractions are 100% heterosexual now. Almost no person who has gone on that journey will say that — they almost always admit that homosexuality is still a struggle and still a temptation, and for Christians to pretend that homosexual tendencies simply evaporate after conversion — or even after heterosexual marriage — does a disservice to ex-gays and their husbands and wives, who need the support and help of a loving community.

    With that aside, what I find interesting is that even the academic gay elite do not believe in fixed sexual orientation. They may say they do when it’s politically expedient, but usually, they’re more than willing to encourage the idea that sexuality is completely fluid, and that people (mostly heterosexuals) should continue to “experiment” and “explore” throughout life. What draws their anger — and turns them into hypocrites — is when a homosexual chooses to “explore” his or her heterosexuality and chastity, especially if that exploration coincides with a Christian conversion. It’s the reverse of the narrative they usually want to tell, but they don’t seem to realize that it actually fits into their narrative of fluid, changeable sexuality quite well.

  6. Carolina writes,
    “Bisexual” isn’t a made-up category. It simply means a person who is attracted to both genders.

    Let me clarify what I mean. It is a made-up category in the sense that it is designed to allow individuals whose sexual lusts drives them to engage in sexual sin with both males and females without impunity of guilt.

    It is similar to the concept of a “trans-gendered” who claims he is really a woman. The category of “trans-gendered” allows his mental illness to be minimized and society to be forced to accept it without question. If he gets radically saved, returns to being a man and through discipleship and accountability becomes a husband and father, will the gay activists rise up and claim the guy was never really “trans-gendered?” Or that maybe he was a “bi-trans-gendered.” Such categories are nonsensical.

    Let’s not pretend that those who have struggled against same-sex attractions are 100% heterosexual now.

    I’ve never claimed as much. The process of sanctification may take longer for others. Just like when I got saved, any heterosexual sin I engaged my mind in, say like pornography, didn’t just evaporate overnight. A habitual philanderer will still certainly struggle with the temptation of his philandering ways. The point is is that his heart was regenerated, God saved Him, and now he is being sanctified. Even Butterfield recognized this in her testimony if you read her faqs page.

    The gay activist has no sense of genuine, spiritual transformation. A transformation that recognizes there is specific sexual sin that offends a holy God, that that sin will bring a person into living a particular lifestyle, that God can and does save and redeem the most hardened in that lifestyle, and that that person can live a sexual life that is pleasing to God in a faithful, husband and wife relationship.

    To tip-toe around these issues as if we have to handle people with same sex orientation as special cases, different from any other person out in the world ensnared in sexual sin, is not trusting God’s ability to save and transform.

  7. “[A]nd that that person can live a sexual life that is pleasing to God in a faithful, husband and wife relationship.”

    Or contented celibacy and singleness. Let’s not forget us. :)

    I wasn’t accusing you of anything, by the way, which is why my entire comment wasn’t a direct reply. It was just a general reminder that whatever words one uses for them, these individuals do exist and these temptations are very real and difficult, a fact that many people seem to forget. I’ve noticed, in my experience, that a lot of Christians don’t often acknowledge temptations that they haven’t experienced themselves — which is just human nature, to be fair — but it’s why there’s often a lack of understanding and success when it comes to reaching out to sexual sinners who are outside the heterosexual norm. I mean, transsexual individuals are certainly mentally ill, but many churches are very ill-equipped to deal with any kind of mental illness, let alone that one. A lot of people seem to think that a homosexual or transsexual engages in that lifestyle just to be different, or rebellious, or to sneer at normal, heterosexual society. While that may be true for some, it’s not true for most, whose temptations are a result of a complicated and highly individualistic mixture of psychology, heredity, illness, and environment.

    Anyway, it’s not about singling out anyone for being special. That’s wasn’t the intention. We’re all complex and we all need a strong and understanding faith community to provide accountability and discipleship. I was just trying to call attention to the fact that, among many churches, the idea is that the heterosexual sinner needs an accountability group, prayer, counseling, and understanding from his peers… while the homosexual sinner just needs to be told to “stop that.” That’s a deadly mindset for sinners who need help.

  8. Hi Fred, Jay (Carolina Caffeine),

    I’m having trouble understanding the way in which the term “mental illness” has been used here. Beginning with Fred’s comment: “The category of “trans-gendered” allows his mental illness to be minimized…” and Jay’s affirmative: “…transsexual individuals are certainly mentally ill“.

    Perhaps I’m missing something (certainly no surprise there :) but isn’t it rather the un-regenerated mind/heart (i.e. sin) that should be pointed to rather than a mental illness? In which we are all born “mentally ill”? Thanks for any clarification.

    I also want to say..after reading some of CC’s blogs; Praise God for His grace in your life, Jay! May you continue to grow strong in the faith and be a beacon of light to others..

  9. Thanks. I’m not really an expert on the matter, but my understand is that the brain is a physical organ like any other, and it can get sick, affecting our thoughts and behavior. I don’t think that excuses sin, but it should affect how we go about reaching out and disciplining those in need, don’t you think? A man who strongly believes he is a woman — and feels suicidal about that fact, as many transsexual individuals do — might need more expert therapeutic care. Too bad such care is often viewed as a hate crime if it doesn’t fit with the leftist worldview.

  10. No expert here either, I just thought the phrase “mental illness” seemed out of place in this context. There might be a need in the orthodox dialog for more discrimination in what we attribute “mental illness” to, I think? (as well as in the secular world).

    I agree that the brain is a physical organ subject to physiological disease, which in turn could effect the way in which a person thinks and acts-out than they otherwise would, but then I wonder..is there truly such a thing as “mental illness” outside of pathology? (physical disease?) Obviously the APA would strongly disagree, but does the bible? (not discounting other potential factors involved such as environment or traumatic upbringing-but for the sake of brevity..)

    I suppose since we are all born separated from the Father, apart from Christ and outside of the protecting influence of the Holy Spirit, on some level all of u are ill-minded; mentally ill and so subjected to whatever this world and its influences offer. But by God’s divine will and grace do we ever go. Ultimately a person walks in one of just two ways in this world: either as a slave to righteousness or as a slave to sin–whatever those sins are.

    When it comes to “how we go about reaching out and discipling those in need” I’d say the same way we would come along side any brother or sister seeking help, bring them to the Word and speak truth in love. This might include “more expert therapeutic care”.
    Isa 42:3; Eph 4:2; Rom 12:10-16

    Anyway, sorry I have rambled on so much! we’re probably more in agreement than anything. Thanks for the exchange :)

  11. Suzanne writes,
    No expert here either, I just thought the phrase “mental illness” seemed out of place in this context. There might be a need in the orthodox dialog for more discrimination in what we attribute “mental illness” to, I think? (as well as in the secular world).

    If you are saying that “mental illness” can ultimately be traced back to man’s fall into sin and is essentially spiritual in nature, I would agree with you. However, I do make something of a distinction between a person who struggles with homosexual sin and another person who seriously wants to physically alter his body with the use of chemical hormone treatments and even surgery. Those individuals need to be rescued from their decisions, because they are so given over to their sin that they are acting irrationally and only seek to permanently hurt themselves.

    In that case, I believe a person can be said to be “mentally ill.” Rather than encouraging their self-destructive behavior by passing feel good laws that makes normal people “affirm” their insanity, their needs to be an intervention. Obviously by the LORD, but also, by certain authorities that can help the person. That is what I am meaning.

  12. I don’t think there’s much disagreement here. Many people who struggle with sexual issues — whether homosexual temptations or gender identity crises — have experienced childhood trauma or abuse, and there have been some interesting studies into how trauma in early childhood affects brain chemistry. It doesn’t excuse sin, but it does affect some of our interventions.

  13. Hi Fred,
    You said: “If you are saying that “mental illness” can ultimately be traced back to man’s fall into sin and is essentially spiritual in nature, I would agree with you. However, I do make something of a distinction between a person who struggles with homosexual sin and another person who seriously wants to physically alter his body with the use of chemical hormone treatments and even surgery”

    Of course we can begin with the Fall, but I had a further distinction in mind, the one between the old man and the new man in Christ, particularly in matters of a regenerated mind, even more particularly with the term “mental illness” a it relates to all this. I agree that the measures people will take to become something else (there are other, more profoundly strange examples of this..) can be horrendous, but I don’t understand categorizing such as “mentally ill” – at least as I (rather limitedley) understand what mental illness is. I want to understand it through the filter of scripture.

    (“Those individuals need to be rescued from their decisions, because they are so given over to their sin that they are acting irrationally and only seek to permanently hurt themselves.
    What really is the difference between a person who struggles with homosexual sin and a transgendered/transsexual? There are the obvious differences, but the heart is the same in an un-regenerated person no matter what’s going on on the outside. Do acts of physically altering the body in such drastic ways render a person more in need of being “rescued from their decisions” than the average homosexual, or prostitute, or drug addict (etc etc)?

    In that case, I believe a person can be said to be “mentally ill.

    What about the person who no longer struggles (as such) with homosexual sin but is completely given over to it? Continuing, quite to their own destruction, in a life of surpressing the truth in unrighteouness; growing in their hardness of heart toward an identity with the image of God, is that a worse such effacing?

    Rather than encouraging their self-destructive behavior by passing feel good laws that makes normal people “affirm” their insanity, their needs to be an intervention…by certain authorities that can help the person.

    I really despise “feel good laws” :-)
    Not sure I understand this last bit (“authorities“?..but I’m thinking the train has long since left that station where “normal” (discerning) people exist; and an “intervention” in such a case would be of any real affect (not saying impossible). We agree–the Gospel is the the only Hope.

    I don’t mean to make a big deal out of this. My observations are just that, unstudied observations. But I’m really interested in these things, so I really appreciate the exchange.

    Thanks for having taken the time to respond, Fred, I know you have a life :)
    Have a blessed Lord’s day ~

Leave me a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s