Joe Carter Creates A Conspiracy

Joe Carter, the TGC never-Trumper who routinely data-mines Wikipedia providing the world with Big Eva think pieces, has favored us with a breathless warning of ecclesiastical danger.

The Christian Church is becoming infiltrated by QAnon and Alt-Right cultic forces.

If you are like most Christians, your immediate response is “Who?” Folks can read his article to get the gist of who or what QAnon is supposed to be and do. Needless to say, Joe thinks they are a dire threat against the Christian church even risking the pushing open of the very gates of hell to prevail against God’s redeemed.

If we chase Joe’s white rabbit, however, in reality he is troubled that serious Christians supported Trump in 2016 and he is extremely annoyed that even more will support him in 2020. This is especially true in light of the fact that they have witnessed how crazy leftist Democrats hate them, America, and anything that stands in the way of their leftist progressive Utopia breaking forth upon the planet. If those Evangelical were like me, a Ted Cruz guy throughout the 2016 election, the last four years have only demonstrated that Trump – warts and all – is the only rational option. He is a flawed man for sure, but he is the one man who actually loves America, it’s people, and it’s core values. Democrats want to fundamentally change that as Obama proclaimed back in 2008.

At any rate, Joe is convinced that during these last four years, conspiracy theories have abounded, and hapless Trump evangelicals, blinded by their unwavering adoration of Trump and their America First religious ways, have allowed conspiracy theories to cloud their thinking, the QAnon conspiracy being the most insidious. But do serious evangelicals know what QAnon is? I mean really?  He tries to bolster his QAnon taking over the church thesis by comparing it to groups like Lyndon LaRauche and the Aryan nation, but they are just as way out fringe and virtually unknown to most faithful Christians as QAnon. It’s actually an insipid comparison.

Joe only lists two conspiracies as examples of his conspiracies seeping into the church, flat earthism and the belief that COVID 19 originated in a bio weapons lab.

Notice the sinister conflation. Anyone even familiar with flat earthism knows it is a kooky idea that swirls around in the fever swamps among moonbats on the internet. If I would venture a guess, most of them are untethered from a solid church and are the kinds of individuals who are easily tossed to and fro by every wind of doctrine. No serious minded Christian believes anything they promote.

The Wuhan bio weapons lab, however, is a possibility. Remember how Arkansas senator, Tom Cotton, was ridiculed for pushing what was called a debunked conspiracy theory when he suggested this very idea?  WaPo ran a ridiculing hit piece against him in early February, and since then, intelligence has put forth some serious evidence that COVID 19 is a virus that originated in a lab.

Of course, only a few are saying the CCP intentionally manufactured the virus as a weapon, but the bat-to-human transfer involving some anonymous adventure tourist eating bat soup at a wet market in Wuhan is a bit fishy. Being a kid raised during the end of the cold war, I know that commies lie all the time. They also do dastardly things, and have a horrifically bad human rights track record. Moreover, they govern with catastrophic incompetence, Chernobyl for example. It is easy to see the same thing happening with the current communist thug cartel running China. Joe insists that a conspiracy cannot be believed without data and evidence. Okay. But there is lots of evidence that COVID 19 originated in a viral research facility near that wet market. Jim Geraghty lays out the trail in this article.

Unironically, however, he believes conspiracies without the presence of data and evidence. The biggest: the Russian collusion hoax that was initiated by the HRC campaign and investigated by direct order from Obama. Joe believes it was all legit, because that terrible Trump had to be colluding with Russians, the kind of conspiracy that lacked data and evidence as Joe outlines in his article. Now that conspiracy he believed for so long is crumbling day by day as documents are declassified.

More and more, during the last three years of Trump, we have seen absolute jaw dropping reports in the MSM, sources of news I imagine Joe believes are trustworthy and fair-minded, telling us Trump was finished. Almost without exception, all of those bombshell reports confidently predicting it was the beginning of the end as the walls are closing in on Trump were retracted within 24-hours. Believing legacy media without question is itself believing conspiracy theories.

Now that the Russian hoax has been exposed and all his hopes that Trump would be hauled from the White House in hand cuffs have been dashed to pieces, Joe has turned to projecting his conspiracy theory failure onto the Christian Church by creating a fresh conspiracy theory that accuses countless believers of drinking the QAnon kool-aid. The only problem is that the vast, vast majority of believers literally know nothing about QAnon. In a way it is slander, though a passive aggressive slander, the kind he decries at the conclusion of his article.